Frank Whipple Renwick1,2

M, #27322, b. 5 February 1867, d. 4 November 1949
Father*George L Renwick3,2,4 b. c 1844, d. b 1922
Mother*Susan A Whipple2,4 b. c 1842
Last Edited11 Nov 2016
     He was born on 5 February 1867 at Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, USA.1,3,2 Frank married Margaret Ann Concannon on 30 September 1890 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.3,2,5,6,7,8
     He died on 4 November 1949 at Kane County, Illinois, USA, at age 82.1

Census Data

     Frank appeared on the 1870 Federal Census Elgin Twp., Kane County, Illinois in the household of his parents, George L Renwick and Susan Renwick.4 Frank Whipple Renwick appeared on the 1900 U.S. Federal Census of Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, enumerated 14 June 1900, enumerated as "Contractor Gravel."8 He appeared on the 1930 U.S. Federal Census of Geneva Twp., Kane County, Illinois, enumerated 11 April 1930, enumerated as a gravel producer and his son, George was the manager. Frank was 23 and Margaret was 22 when they were married.7

Family

Margaret Ann Concannon b. 15 Jan 1868, d. 17 Nov 1943
Children

Citations

  1. [S319] Illinois Statewide Death Index, 1916-1950 (Publisher: Illinois State Archives), Database of Illinois Death Certificates, 1916–1950, Illinois Statewide Death Index, 1916-1950 (search page); "Index only, copies may be order"; cited as "IL deaths., RENWICK FRANK WHIPPLE M/W Y-82 0015478 1949-04-11 KANE.
  2. [S3509] Albert Nelson Marquis, editor, The Book of Chicagoans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men and women of the City of Chicago (Chicago, IL: A. N. Marquis & Company, 1917), Page 564 & 565 - Renwick, Frank Whipple. Hereinafter cited as Book of Chicagoans.
  3. [S3496] Passport, ARC Identifier 583830 / MLR Number A1 534; Renwick, Frank Whipple, Passport Applications; NARA Series: M1490, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, USA, Name: Frank Whipple Renwick.
  4. [S3514] George L Renwick household, Jul 16, 1870 U.S. census, Provo, Utah, USA, Elgin, Kane, Illinois; Page: 303B, Ancestry.com Roll: M593_237; Image: 195.
  5. [S3491] Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 , Ancestry.com, Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947; ""Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916–1947." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original records."; cited as "IL Deaths & Stillbirths., Name: Margaret Ann Renwick
    [Margaret Ann Concannon].
  6. [S3517] Cook County, Illinois Marriages Index, 1871-1920 (Publisher: FamilySearch), Ancestry.com, Cook County, Illinois Marriages Index, 1871-1920; "Illinois Department of Public Health records"; cited as "Cook County Ill Marriages., Frank Renwick & Margaret A. Concannon.
  7. [S3518] Frank W Renwick household, 11 Apr 1930 U.S. Census, Provo, Utah, USA, Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 82, Ancestry.com Roll: 524; Image: 1019.0., Frank W Renwick household.
  8. [S3519] Frank W Renwick household, 14 June 1900 U.S. Census, Provo, Utah, USA, Page: 20A; Enumeration District: 968., Ancestry.com Roll: T623_284, Frank W Renwick household.

George L Renwick1,2,3

M, #27323, b. circa 1844, d. before 1922
Last Edited11 Nov 2016
     He was born circa 1844 at Illinois, USA.3 George married Susan A Whipple on 14 September 1863 at Kane County, Illinois, USA.2,3,4
     He died before 1922.1

Census Data

     George L Renwick and Susan Renwick appeared on the 1870 U.S. Federal Census of Elgin Twp., Kane County, Illinois, enumerated 16 July 1870, enumerated as a manufacturer with Real Estate valued at $1,500. Their children Maggie and Frank were listed as living with them.3

Family

Susan A Whipple b. c 1842
Children

Citations

  1. [S3496] Passport, ARC Identifier 583830 / MLR Number A1 534; Renwick, Frank Whipple, Passport Applications; NARA Series: M1490, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, USA, Name: Frank Whipple Renwick.
  2. [S3509] Albert Nelson Marquis, editor, The Book of Chicagoans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men and women of the City of Chicago (Chicago, IL: A. N. Marquis & Company, 1917), Page 564 & 565 - Renwick, Frank Whipple. Hereinafter cited as Book of Chicagoans.
  3. [S3514] George L Renwick household, Jul 16, 1870 U.S. census, Provo, Utah, USA, Elgin, Kane, Illinois; Page: 303B, Ancestry.com Roll: M593_237; Image: 195.
  4. [S3515] Illinois Marriages, 1851-1900, online http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7857, George L. Renwick & Susan A. Blanchard. Hereinafter cited as Illinois Marriages, 1851-1900.

Margaret Ann Concannon1,2,3,4,5

F, #27324, b. 15 January 1868, d. 17 November 1943
Father*William Concannon3
Last Edited23 Oct 2016
     She was born on 15 January 1868 at Clinton, Oneida County, New York, USA.1,3,4,5,6 Margaret married Frank Whipple Renwick on 30 September 1890 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.1,2,3,7,4,5
     She died on 17 November 1943 at Geneva, Kane County, Illinois, USA, at age 75.3 Margaret Ann Concannon was buried on 20 November 1943 at Bluff City Cemetery, Elgin, Elgin Twp., Kane County, Illinois, USA.3

Census Data

     Margaret Ann Concannon appeared on the 1900 U.S. Federal Census of Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, in the household of Frank Whipple Renwick.5 Margaret Ann Concannon appeared on the 1930 U.S. Federal Census of Geneva Twp., Kane County, Illinois, in the household of Frank Whipple Renwick.4

Family

Frank Whipple Renwick b. 5 Feb 1867, d. 4 Nov 1949
Children

Citations

  1. [S3496] Passport, ARC Identifier 583830 / MLR Number A1 534; Renwick, Frank Whipple, Passport Applications; NARA Series: M1490, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, USA, Name: Frank Whipple Renwick.
  2. [S3509] Albert Nelson Marquis, editor, The Book of Chicagoans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men and women of the City of Chicago (Chicago, IL: A. N. Marquis & Company, 1917), Page 564 & 565 - Renwick, Frank Whipple. Hereinafter cited as Book of Chicagoans.
  3. [S3491] Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 , Ancestry.com, Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947; ""Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916–1947." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original records."; cited as "IL Deaths & Stillbirths., Name: Margaret Ann Renwick
    [Margaret Ann Concannon].
  4. [S3518] Frank W Renwick household, 11 Apr 1930 U.S. Census, Provo, Utah, USA, Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 82, Ancestry.com Roll: 524; Image: 1019.0., Frank W Renwick household.
  5. [S3519] Frank W Renwick household, 14 June 1900 U.S. Census, Provo, Utah, USA, Page: 20A; Enumeration District: 968., Ancestry.com Roll: T623_284, Frank W Renwick household.
  6. [S2242] Cook County, Illinois Marriage Index, 1930-1960, online Cook County, Illinois Marriage Index, 1930-1960, Frank Renwick & Margaret A. Concannon. Hereinafter cited as Cook County Ill Marriages.
  7. [S3517] Cook County, Illinois Marriages Index, 1871-1920 (Publisher: FamilySearch), Ancestry.com, Cook County, Illinois Marriages Index, 1871-1920; "Illinois Department of Public Health records"; cited as "Cook County Ill Marriages., Frank Renwick & Margaret A. Concannon.

Susan A Whipple1,2,3

F, #27325, b. circa 1842
Father*David Whipple4,3 b. c 1801
Mother*Almina (?)4,3 b. c 1808
Last Edited11 Nov 2016
     She was born circa 1842 at New York, USA.4,3,5 Susan married Nelson L Blanchard on 12 October 1861 at Kane County, Illinois, USA.6 Susan married George L Renwick on 14 September 1863 at Kane County, Illinois, USA.2,5,7

Census Data

     Susan appeared on the 1850 Federal Census of St. Charles, Kane County, Illinois in the household of her parents, David Whipple and Almina Whipple.4

Susan appeared on the 1860 Federal Census St. Charles Twp., Kane County, Illinois in the household of her parents, David Whipple and Almina Whipple, listed as a teacher.3
Susan Renwick and George L Renwick appeared on the 1870 U.S. Federal Census of Elgin Twp., Kane County, Illinois, enumerated 16 July 1870, enumerated as a manufacturer with Real Estate valued at $1,500. Their children Maggie and Frank were listed as living with them.5

Family 2

George L Renwick b. c 1844, d. b 1922
Children

Citations

  1. [S2] Personal knowledge/research of Rick Moffat (Mesa, AZ 85207), see 1870 census.
  2. [S3509] Albert Nelson Marquis, editor, The Book of Chicagoans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men and women of the City of Chicago (Chicago, IL: A. N. Marquis & Company, 1917), Page 564 & 565 - Renwick, Frank Whipple. Hereinafter cited as Book of Chicagoans.
  3. [S3513] David Whipple household, June 6, 1860 U.S. census, Provo, Utah, USA, St Charles, Kane, Illinois; Page: 276, Ancestry.com Roll: M653_191; Image: 44.
  4. [S3512] David Whipple household, Oct 5, 1850 U.S. census, Provo, Utah, USA, St Charles, Kane, Illinois; Page: 105A, Ancestry.com Roll: M432_112; Image: 322.
  5. [S3514] George L Renwick household, Jul 16, 1870 U.S. census, Provo, Utah, USA, Elgin, Kane, Illinois; Page: 303B, Ancestry.com Roll: M593_237; Image: 195.
  6. [S3515] Illinois Marriages, 1851-1900, online http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7857, Nelson L. Blanchard & Susan Whipple. Hereinafter cited as Illinois Marriages, 1851-1900.
  7. [S3515] Illinois Marriages, 1851-1900, online http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7857, George L. Renwick & Susan A. Blanchard.

Priscilla Truss1

F, #27326, b. circa 1802, d. 1856
Father*Samuel Truss2
Mother*Sylvia Cobb2
Last Edited13 Mar 2015
     She was born circa 1802 at North Carolina, USA.1,2 Priscilla married William Alford on 23 February 1829 at St. Clair County, Alabama, USA.1,2
     She died in 1856 at St. Clair County, Alabama, USA.1
     She also went by the name of Prissa.3

Family

William Alford b. c 1810, d. 1 May 1885
Children

Citations

  1. [S3497] L K Worsham, online http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/26655971/, L K Worsham (Katy, Texas), downloaded viewed Nov 25, 2011, William ALFORD
    Birth 1810 in Morgan, Georgia
    Death 1 May 1885 in Ashville, St. Clair, Alabama.
  2. [S4199] Find A Grave memorial page , Find A Grave, Find A Grave search page; "A database submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery interments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and often supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included."; cited as "Find A Grave., http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi William Alford.
  3. [S3497] L K Worsham, viewed Nov 25, 2011, Priscilla "Prissa" TRUSS.
  4. [S3497] L K Worsham, viewed Nov 25, 2011, John Allen ALFORD
    son of William Alford and Priscilla Truss.

William Irvine Staugton1

M, #27327
Last Edited29 Nov 2011
     William married Eugina (?).1

Family

Eugina (?)
Child

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., Edmund Aled Macnachtan & Emma Florence Staunton.

Eugina (?)1

F, #27328
Last Edited29 Nov 2011
     Eugina married William Irvine Staugton.1

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., Edmund Aled Macnachtan & Emma Florence Staunton.

Jeannie Hervey Lawder1

F, #27329, b. 16 July 1854, d. 19 December 1909
Father*Robert Hervey Lawder1,2
Mother*Catherine Jane Welsh1 b. 6 Jun 1827
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     She was born on 16 July 1854 at Whitby, Ontario County, Ontario, Canada.1,2,3,4 Jeannie married Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan on 26 June 1879 at Whitby, Ontario County, Ontario, Canada, according to Ontario Marriage Registration 007953.1,4
     She died on 19 December 1909 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada, at age 55 according to Ontario Death Registration 021028. She died 10 days after her daughter, Kathleen.. The informant was Neil F MacNachtan.5 Jeannie Hervey Lawder was buried at Cobourg Union Cemetery, Cobourg, Hamilton Twp., Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada.6,7

Census Data

     Jeannie H McNachtan and N F McNachtan appeared on the 1881 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, enumerated 4 April 1881, enumerated as a merchant and a Presbyterian. Their daughter Ethel R was listed as living with them.3
     N F McNachtan and Jennie appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, enumerated 19 April 1901. N was enumerated as county clerk and treasurer. Their children Ethel R, Cathleen, Nora and Edmud (sic) L were listed as living with them. His mother-in-law, Catherine Lawder resided in his household.4
     She also went by the name of Jean.7

Family

Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan b. 5 Feb 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
Marriage*Jeannie married Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan on 26 June 1879 at Whitby, Ontario County, Ontario, Canada, according to Ontario Marriage Registration 007953.1,4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., Neil F Macnachtan & Jeannie Hervey Lawder.
  2. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Jeannie Hervey MacNachtan
    born: July 16, 1854.
  3. [S3571] N F McNachtan household, April 4, 1881 Canada census, Provo, Utah, USA, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page 26, Family No: 128., Ancestry.com Roll: C-13240.
  4. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.
  5. [S1442] "ON Deaths, 1869-1946", online Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946: Name: Jeannie Hervey MacNachtan.
  6. [S219] Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid (1996), online http://www.islandnet.com/ocfa/, MacNACHTON, Jean Hervey (Lawder) (w/o Col)     Cobourg Union     Northumberland     Hamilton     LSGS-019. Hereinafter cited as OCFA.
  7. [S3580] Leigh LeBlanc, "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan," e-mail message from email address withheld for privacy (Ottawa, Ontario) to Rick Moffat, 17 Jan 2012, After finding the MacNachtan's in the OCFA index, I contacted volunteer Leigh LeBlanc who provided transcriptions.. Hereinafter cited as "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan."
  8. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Ethel Renwick Mcnachtan
    Her father's name was signed as N F MacNachtan and he was a Merchant. Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  9. [S1442] "ON Deaths, 1869-1946", online Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946: Name: Kathleen Harvey MacNachtan
    born: Jan 7, 1882.
  10. [S1443] ON Births 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Nora Mcnachtan
    Her father's name was signed as N F MacNachtan and he was a Merchant.
  11. [S1443] ON Births 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Edmund Macnachton Lawder
    His father was a "Merchant in Cobourg."

Robert Hervey Lawder1

M, #27330
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     He was born at Scotland.2 Robert married Catherine Jane Welsh.1

Family

Catherine Jane Welsh b. 6 Jun 1827
Child

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., Neil F Macnachtan & Jeannie Hervey Lawder.
  2. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Jeannie Hervey MacNachtan
    born: July 16, 1854.

Catherine Jane Welsh1

F, #27331, b. 6 June 1827
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     She was born on 6 June 1827 at Ontario, Canada.2,3 Catherine married Robert Hervey Lawder.1

Census Data

     Catherine appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, in the household of N F McNachtan and Jennie McNachtan.3

Family

Robert Hervey Lawder
Child

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., Neil F Macnachtan & Jeannie Hervey Lawder.
  2. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Jeannie Hervey MacNachtan
    born: July 16, 1854.
  3. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.

Rachel MacNachtan1,2

F, #27332, b. 1857 or 1858
Father*Edmund Aled MacNachtan1,2 b. 25 Apr 1825, d. 22 Jul 1891
Mother*Elizabeth Renwick1,2 b. 11 Mar 1828, d. 25 Dec 1909
Relationship2nd cousin 2 times removed of Richard Graeme Moffat
Last Edited2 May 2012
     She was born in 1857 or 1858 at Ontario, Canada.1,2 Rachel married George Ross Hargraft on 14 September 1881 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada, according to Ontario Marriage Registration 007700.1

Census Data

     Rachel MacNachtan appeared on the 1871 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her parents, Edmund Macnachtan and Elizabeth MacNachtan.2

Family

George Ross Hargraft b. c 1856
Children

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., George Ross Hargraft & Rachel Macnachtan.
  2. [S3572] Edmund Macnachtan household, April 2, 1871 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 44, Family: 169, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: C-9983.
  3. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: George Neil Hargraft. Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  4. [S1443] ON Births 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Lawrence Hargraft.

George Ross Hargraft1

M, #27333, b. circa 1856
Father*William Hargraft1
Mother*Mary Ross1
Last Edited2 May 2012
     He was born circa 1856 at Canada.1 George married Rachel MacNachtan on 14 September 1881 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada, according to Ontario Marriage Registration 007700.1
     George Ross Hargraft was the informant on the death registration of Edmund Aled MacNachtan.2,3,4

Family

Rachel MacNachtan b. 1857 or 1858
Children

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., George Ross Hargraft & Rachel Macnachtan.
  2. [S1154] Donna Renwick, "Descendents of Edmund MacNachten per Donna Renwick," e-mail message from confidential (unknown address) to Rick Moffat, Sept 10, 2005, Edmund MacNachten Residence: Newcastle and Cobourg d: Bef. 1903 in of Newcastle and Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. Hereinafter cited as "Desc E MacNachten."
  3. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Edmund Alexander Macnachtan.
  4. [S3580] Leigh LeBlanc, "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan," e-mail message from email address withheld for privacy (Ottawa, Ontario) to Rick Moffat, 17 Jan 2012, After finding the MacNachtan's in the OCFA index, I contacted volunteer Leigh LeBlanc who provided transcriptions.. Hereinafter cited as "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan."
  5. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: George Neil Hargraft. Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  6. [S1443] ON Births 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Lawrence Hargraft.

William Hargraft1

M, #27334
Last Edited2 May 2012
     William married Mary Ross.1

Family

Mary Ross
Child

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., George Ross Hargraft & Rachel Macnachtan.

Mary Ross1

F, #27335
Last Edited2 May 2012
     Mary married William Hargraft.1

Family

William Hargraft
Child

Citations

  1. [S1444] Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1826-1936 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario, Toronto), Archives of Ontario, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1785-1935; "Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages. Archives of Ontario, Toronto. This database includes images of the registrations. In some cases, alternative images in FamilySearch provide additional information"; cited as "Ontario Marriages, 1826-1936., George Ross Hargraft & Rachel Macnachtan.

Kathleen Hervey MacNachtan1

F, #27337, b. 7 January 1882, d. 9 December 1909
Father*Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan1,2 b. 5 Feb 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
Mother*Jeannie Hervey Lawder1,2 b. 16 Jul 1854, d. 19 Dec 1909
Relationship3rd cousin 1 time removed of Richard Graeme Moffat
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     She was born on 7 January 1882.1 Alternatively, she was born on 7 July 1882 at Ontario, Canada, according to the 1901 census.2
     She died on 9 December 1909 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada, at age 27 according to Ontario Death Registration 021027. She died 10 days before her mother. Her death registration indicates she was a spinster.. The informant was Neil F MacNachtan.1 Kathleen Hervey MacNachtan was buried at Cobourg Union Cemetery, Cobourg, Hamilton Twp., Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada.3,4

Census Data

     Cathleen McNachtan appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her parents, N F McNachtan and Jennie McNachtan.2
     Her name was also recorded as Cathleen McNachtan.2

Citations

  1. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Kathleen Harvey MacNachtan
    born: Jan 7, 1882.
  2. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.
  3. [S219] Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid (1996), online http://www.islandnet.com/ocfa/, MacNACHTON, Kathleen Hervey     Cobourg Union     Northumberland     Hamilton     LSGS-019. Hereinafter cited as OCFA.
  4. [S3580] Leigh LeBlanc, "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan," e-mail message from email address withheld for privacy (Ottawa, Ontario) to Rick Moffat, 17 Jan 2012, After finding the MacNachtan's in the OCFA index, I contacted volunteer Leigh LeBlanc who provided transcriptions.. Hereinafter cited as "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan."

Ethel Renwick MacNachtan1

F, #27338, b. 2 August 1880
Father*Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan1,2,3,4 b. 5 Feb 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
Mother*Jeannie Hervey Lawder1,2,4 b. 16 Jul 1854, d. 19 Dec 1909
Relationship3rd cousin 1 time removed of Richard Graeme Moffat
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     She was born on 2 August 1880 at Northumberland and Durham County, Ontario, Canada, according to Ontario Birth Registration 022551. This document lists her father's occupation as a Merchant.1,2,3,4

Census Data

     Ethel R McNachtan appeared on the 1881 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her parents, N F McNachtan and Jeannie H McNachtan.2
     Ethel R McNachtan appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her parents, N F McNachtan and Jennie McNachtan.4
     Ethel McNachtan appeared on the 1911 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her father Neil F McNachtan.3
     Her name was also recorded as Ethel Renwick McNachtan as recorded on her birth registration.1,2,3,4

Citations

  1. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Ethel Renwick Mcnachtan
    Her father's name was signed as N F MacNachtan and he was a Merchant. Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  2. [S3571] N F McNachtan household, April 4, 1881 Canada census, Provo, Utah, USA, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page 26, Family No: 128., Ancestry.com Roll: C-13240.
  3. [S3573] Neil F McNachtan household, Jun 5, 1911 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page 3, Family: 36, Library and Archives Canada (LAC), Neil F McNachtan household.
  4. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.

Nora MacNachtan1

F, #27339, b. 8 October 1884, d. 1968
Father*Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan1,2,3 b. 5 Feb 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
Mother*Jeannie Hervey Lawder1,3 b. 16 Jul 1854, d. 19 Dec 1909
Relationship3rd cousin 1 time removed of Richard Graeme Moffat
Last Edited10 Jan 2018
     She was born on 8 October 1884 at Northumberland and Durham County, Ontario, Canada.1,3 She was born in October 1886 at Ontario, Canada, according to the 1911 census.2 Nora married Charles Robert Millar in 1916.4
     She died in 1968 at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.5

Census Data

     Nora McNachtan appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her parents, N F McNachtan and Jennie McNachtan.3
     Nora McNachtan appeared on the 1911 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of her father Neil F McNachtan.2
     The following newspaper article appeared in the Colborne, Ontario The Colborne Express 9 February 1928 :
Births
MILLAR
In London, Eng., on Tuesday, January 11, 1921, to Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. (sic) Millar (nee Nora MacNachtan), a son.6

Family

Charles Robert Millar b. 12 Aug 1874, d. 1951
Marriage*Nora married Charles Robert Millar in 1916.4 
Child

Citations

  1. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Nora Mcnachtan
    Her father's name was signed as N F MacNachtan and he was a Merchant. Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  2. [S3573] Neil F McNachtan household, Jun 5, 1911 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page 3, Family: 36, Library and Archives Canada (LAC), Neil F McNachtan household.
  3. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.
  4. [S3581] J and J Wilson, online http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/6628196, J and J Wilson (unknown location), downloaded viewed Jan 17, 2012, Charles Robert Millar.
  5. [S3581] J and J Wilson, viewed Jan 17, 2012, Nora MacNachton
    Nora MacNaughton
    Nora MacNaughton.
  6. [S8182] Births: Millar, The Colborne Express, Colborne, ON, Feb 9, 1921, Page 1, column 4 viewed at Cramache Archives, Birth: son of Charles and Nora Millar née MacNachtan. Hereinafter cited as Colborne Express.
  7. [S3581] J and J Wilson, viewed Jan 17, 2012, Robert Neil Millar.

Edmund Lawder MacNachtan1,2

M, #27340, b. 21 July 1887, d. 1947
Father*Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan3,4,5,6 b. 5 Feb 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
Mother*Jeannie Hervey Lawder3,5 b. 16 Jul 1854, d. 19 Dec 1909
Relationship3rd cousin 1 time removed of Richard Graeme Moffat
Last Edited19 Oct 2019
     He was born on 21 July 1887 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada.3,4 Alternatively, he was born on 22 July 1887 at Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada, according to the 1901 census.1,5
     He died in 1947.7 Edmund Lawder MacNachtan was buried at Cobourg Union Cemetery, Cobourg, Hamilton Twp., Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada.8,7
     
Canadian Military Service:

     Pte Edmund Lawder MacNachtan began military service on 23 September 1914 at the age of 27 at Valcartier, Québec, Canada, on his WWI Attestation papers, he gave his occupation as Surveyor. He reported 5 years service in the Cobourg Artillery Battery (Lieut) and 3 years in the 14th Battalion. He joined the 9th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery.6
     On 29 August 1914 he was promoted Sergeant "in the field." This date occurs on several forms in his file. One entry was made May 31, 1916. Was it a notation of an earlier promotion?6
     On 1 August 1916 he was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the 2nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery. On Jan. 14, 1917, he was transferred to "E" Battery, Canadian Anti-Aircraft Artillery.6 Captain Edmund Lawder MacNachtan ended military service as part of general demobilization on 24 June 1919 at Montréal, Québec, Canada. He had served in England and France with several artillery units.
End of Military Service section.6

Census Data

     Edmud (sic) L MacNachtan appeared on the 1901 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of his parents, N F McNachtan and Jennie McNachtan.5
     Edmund McNachtan appeared on the 1911 Canadian Census of Cobourg, Northumberland County, Ontario in the household of his father Neil F McNachtan.4
     He also went by the name of Ted.1,9
     The following newspaper article appeared in the Cobourg, Ontario Cobourg World 26 March 1915 :
Cobourg World Letter: 1915 March 26th

By kind permission of Col. Neil F. MacNachtan, C.V.D., we are allowed to publish the following letter from his son, who is at the Front in France.

France,
March 2nd, 1915.

and came out with a whole skin. A few of the men were chosen from each Canadian Brigade to go out to the firing line to see how things were done and I was one of the lucky ones. The infantry were attached, so many to a battalion of the imperials and we were attached to different royal field batteries.

We were shelled three or four times but there were no casualties among the two batteries we were with, although some shells burst decidedly, and I may add, unpleasantly close. I also spent one night up in the trenches with the infantry and had several shots at the German trenches with a rifle. I only saw one German, he stuck his head and shoulders above the parapet long enough for me to take a snip at him. I squirted dirt over him but I do not think that I hit him, however he stayed down the rest of the time I was out there. There was one poor Canadian shot within a few yards of me. It was a horrible sickening sound to hear a bullet hit a man. The bullet struck him on the right side of the neck and came out through his left shoulder. It looked like a dum-dum for there was a hole larger than my clenched fist where it came out. Half a dozen bullets struck the sandbags over my head, but they might as well been miles away. At first I ducked, instinctively, every time a rifle cracked or a bullet whistled near me, but it is wonderful how quickly one becomes accustomed to it. After a few moments of it, one doesn't pay any attention to them.

When I was going out to the trenches the brutes turned a maxim loose down a railroad that we had to walk along. There were bullets buzzing around us like bees.

To go back a few weeks. We had a rather exciting trip across in a rotten little cattle boat; it pitched and rolled like a cork a good many of those on board are sick, but either I am lucky, or a good sailor, anyway I refused to feed the fish. We were tumbled into box cars, and had a beautiful two days ride. The railway at its worst can't hold a candle to that railroad. I thought we were off the track and running along the sleepers. It was great!

There is not much going on at present, practically all sniping. The Germans have some wonderful shots among them, although they are not, as an army any better shots than our Tommies. The swine usually fire a few shells over just at meal hours or as the men are going to bed. Then it is 'Stand to' for perhaps an hour and break off or on lucky occasions a few rounds are fired back. It is wonderful the small attention paid to bullets and shellbursts. Men and women walk along roads and streets apparently quite unconcerned. One day we got a 'stand to.' There was a man ploughing right behind the guns, a good many shells were bursting in the field in which he was working but he paid no attention until one burst really close to him. He looked at us, laughed shrugged his shoulders, French fashion, and calmly proceeded to unhook his horses and get out without any hurry or fuss. Is there anything one cannot become accustomed to?

We are limited to two letters per week per man which is rather a hardship.

EDMUND L. MacNACHTAN.10

     The following newspaper article appeared in the Cobourg, Ontario Cobourg World 15 April 1915 :
Cobourg World Letter: 1915 April 16th

Letter from Sergeant Edmund L. MacNachtan, son of Lt. Col. Neil F. MacNachtan, C. V. O. Cobourg, Ontario

France, 22nd March, 1915

This is the first opportunity I have had to sit down and write a real letter for months, so I am going to take advantage of it (Germans permitting).

I was down to our wagon lines when I last wrote (March 2nd) but now I am up within a few hundred yards of our trenches. We have a 'forward gun' (which is a pleasant little surprise for the Germans in case they should break through our infantry). In case we should open fire, it is a good deal of a 'forlorn hope.' We cannot come into action until after our own infantry have fallen back to a line of trenches beside our gun. This would allow the enemy to get within a few hundred yards of the gun before we can fire. You can imagine how long we would last. The orders read ?To serve gun untill ordered to retire, then retreat with sight, elino and breeck.' They should read 'serve gun until the crew is dead and then retreat,'

There is a sniper very close to us and he pays us a great deal of attention, he was so close to our gun one night and the house we sleep in that I could hear the empty shells from his rifle click on the ground when he rejected them. He put me down on m face six times between the gun and the house we sleep in, a distance of probably two hundred yards, while I was mounting my guard.

We have all had many narrow escapes from the brute. I have been out two or three times looking for him but we cannot locate him. He has a mighty snug retreat wherever he is. We cannot see a flash from his rifle and only a very subdued report from his rifle. He probably has a silencer.

The 4th Battery have been very highly complimented on its shooting by Colonel Morrison. We have raised the ******* with the German trenches. We put a shell right under one of their guns and blew it up. The German artillery open up on our batteries or trenches; we put up with it for a while then we get mad and go after them; we retaliate by blowing great gaps in their trenches and entanglements. We fire over the heads of our Canadian Infantry, some of whom have told us that the effect of our fire is wonderful. We give to them in salvos and the infantry tell us that they cannot see the trenches for smoke of our shell bursts. When it lifts there are great stretches of the parapet blown away and they can see Germans scuttling in all directions for cover like rabbits.

We celebrate St. Patrick's Day in great state. It was the biggest day's work we have had since we came up to this position, the noise was deafening. I was out here at the 'forward gun', quite a number of German shells burst close to us; there were four in particular. 'Coal Boxes' or 'Jack Johnsons' , one burst about 40 yards beyond us and one about twenty or thirty yards short but dead 'on line' for our shack, two others dropped unpleasantly near us but failed to explode. We could hear the brutes coming long before they reached us; they make a dull sort of rumble like a locomotive. It is a creepy sensation to know they have you in a 'hundred yard bracket,' have a line on you and you are waiting for the next round to blow you to pieces. However, that 'next round' did not come, the one that burst short of us threw huge clouds of earth over us in showers. There 'Coal Boxes' get their name from the sooty deposit they leave on the sides of the hole made by the burst. The 'pets' they have fired at us are either six inch or eight inch, weighing ninety to 120 pounds and filled with high explosive. Thereby hangs a tale or rather a joke. One dropped across the road from our billet; this particular one fell between two infantry officers who were standing talking. The concussion of draught (or perhaps pure scare) knocked one of them down, but neither was hurt, not even a scratch. We dug up the shell which had gone fourteen feet into the ground took the 'sting' in other words the percussion primer off and soaked the shell in water for two days before examining it. What do you suppose we found in it? Instead of the deadly high explosive compound we found one quarter of a pound of ordinary black powder - they had forgotten to fill it. This shell goes back to Canada to be placed in Cobourg Armoury. They (the enemy) have the billet at the battery registered, dropped 14 Pro Shrapnal on us the other day. You should see the place. The tile roof is conspicuous by its absence of tiles, the floors and doors are riddled with holes from shrapnel bullets and nearly every pane of glass broken. Apart from this they did not do much damage. One of our fellows was struck by a bullet near the eye and one of the rifles has a splinter as big as the end of a finger embedded in the stock. You should have seen the scrimmage, men came shooting out of windows, doors and haystacks on the jump. We had to laugh in spite of being scared stiff.

No parcels have yet reached me. Please send me a pound of Hudson Bay tobacco, two pipes, some cigarettes and some Canadian matches. It is impossible to buy anything smokeable here and our issues are very small.

I saw Major Beattie a couple of days ago. He looks very well and seems to be getting fat on this life. He is very popular among the men. I also met Major A.E. Kirkpatrick, of the Queen's Own, who wished to be remembered to you.

Regarding the Battery work there is not much to tell you. The drivers are a couple of miles behind us. We have just a gun crew, a few spanes and a couple of cooks up here. Concealed positions are used of course. We have built very solid gun Epaulments at this position with sand bags, sods and brush, even planted trees for concealment. The wagon and limber are placed on either side of the gun, then we build up the walls on the sides about four feet high with sods and sand bags, put a frame work 2' x 4' on top and covered with sods and sand bags so that we have a very snug and very protective gun position.

There are a couple of splinter-proofs behind us in case of a heavy bombardment. It is a splendid position, the fact that we have never been 'found' goes to prove it, although several shells have burst about us. It is all 'indirect method' with aiming points, angles are worked out with bearings taken with Prismatic compass, so we cannot see the effect of our fire, maps are used most exclusively. We have Observing Officers in the infantry trenches who control our fire by telephone. Aeroplanes are used a great deal for observation. There are three or four flying above us all the time. They are fired at a good deal by the anti-aircraft guns somewhere in the German trenches in front of us but cannot locate them. They have not done any damage to our machines while we have been up here, in fact their shooting seems very wild.

We get orders at all hours to 'stand to.' 'Major Halston sends his best regards.

EDMUND L. MacNACHTAN.
4th Battery, 1st. Brigade. C.F.A.10

     The following newspaper article appeared in the Cobourg, Ontario Cobourg World 21 May 1915 :
Cobourg World Letter: 1915 May 21st

Belgium, April 30th, 1915

To Lieut-Col. N.F. MacNachtan, C.V.O.

I wonder if news of what is going on here has reached you yet, if so, you will be terribly anxious. When the General told us we would get it very much hotter here than we had previously experienced, he was dead right. How it is that any of us are still alive is beyond me. It is nothing short of a miracle.

We have been under fire, heavy artillery, for eight days. On Tuesday it was terrific. They started at us with what is known as 'whistling willies,' they are about a fourteen pound shell and are used for ranging. After they got us in a 'twenty-five yard bracket' they started in with high explosives, then things started to happen. The air was simply full of shells, splinters, smoke and blinding choking sickening fumes. A fuse came through the shield of our gun without touching anyone, the same thing happened at No.3 gun, a shell came through No.2 but did not burst until it struck the ground at the trail. No one at No.2 gun was touched but one of the crew at No.1 gun was hit in the shoulder by a splinter. I forgot to say that two guns of the 5th Battery got lost so they attached themselves to our battery. They (the 5th) lost one killed and three wounded. We had one killed and six wounded, one of the latter rather seriously. The man killed was sergeant Boone of Peterborough, an awful fine fellow. Bert Munn was rather badly wounded in the legs (Died).

I hope it will never be my lot to go through another such experience; it lasted nearly all day.

The sensation of sitting behind those guns, just waiting for a shell to strike was terrible. None of us expected to get out, how we came through it all is beyond me.

The men behaved like heroes, every man stuck to his post; there wasn't a quitter among them. We kept on firing as if nothing unusual was happening. Don't get the impression, dad, that we weren't frightened. I am not ashamed to say that I was scared stiff. I think everyone else was, too, but it does not necessarily follow that we were cowards. Probably we will never have another such experience. God knows, I hope not, our nerves are pretty well shattered.

Next morning the 'swine' started at us again; they fired a couple of the same high explosives at us to make sure they had us. Then we heard a rustling noise coming our way. It sounded like a street car exactly, that was all that was needed. We got orders to get out and out we got and take it from me, we didn't lose any time in the 'getting.' We sat down about 100 yards away and watched the 'brutes' start in to finish our poor guns. One of these tremendous shells hit the footboard of our wagon bodily, the whole wagon shot up in the air and there was a regular display of fireworks when the ammunition in it started to go. The gun was blown into an unrecognizable mass of twisted steal. A shell exploded very close to every one of our guns, but only ours, (No. 1) was damaged. We shifted that night.

There has been a terrible struggle going on in front of us for a week. Our poor Canadians have made an undying name, but at what a cost. Our infantry has been very badly cut up and there have been many casualties among our Artillery.

The British troops can't say enough that is good about our infantry; they tell us that nothing stops them they do not know what fear is.
I saw Major Beattie (Chaplain of the first Brigade, Infantry) yesterday. He held a burial service at poor Dicky Boone's burial. The Major looks and seem very well but his nerves are pretty well shaken, like the rest of us, the strain is beginning to tell.

The din about us cannot be imagined; it is like bedlam; dozens of our batteries firing, a fast as they can load and fire, with hundreds of the shells from the Germans contribute to kick-up an ear-splitting row all day long.

Our Battery (4th, 1st Brigade) has been doing wonderful work. Our shooting is very accurate. On Monday last we fired nearly twelve hundred rounds in two hours. Isn't that 'going some.'

I do not know anything else to tell you. The situation seems to change very little out in front of us. One day we made a gain and the next the Germans. This promises to be the biggest battle of the war.
The weather is beautiful, far too fine for such work as we are at.
Au revoir and don't worry,

E.L. MacNACHTAN, Sergeant.
4th Battery, 1st Brigade, C.F.A.11

     The following newspaper article appeared in the Cobourg, Ontario Cobourg World 28 May 1915 :
Cobourg World Letter: 1915 May 28th

BELGIUM, May 5th, 1915.

My Dear Dad:
1 was greatly relieved to get your letter to-night. It was sometime since 1 heard from you and 1 was beginning to feel anxious. I am glad to hear that everything is O.K. Your letter of the 14th of April and Nora's of 12th with a few lines on the back reached me to-night.
I'm sorry that you are not getting my letters, Dad, for I have written regularly and particularly so since we came up here, for I realize the anxiety of those at home just at present. I suppose several letters of mine will reach you together.

We were rushed up to this position on the 23rd of April, the day after the Germans got through by the use of that diabolical gas. We rode up in broad daylight, perhaps that will show you how badly we were needed. If the amount of artillery that is up here now had been behind our Canadian Infantry, they would not have been so badly cut up. They made an everlasting name for themselves and for Canada, but they paid a terrific price for it. The effects of this gas are pitiful to see, a great many of the victims passed us on their way back for treatment. They are practically blind and nearly smothered.

We got into action about 4:30 in the afternoon of 23rd. No digging in or no cover except that afforded by a very thin hedge. As soon as we got our lines laid out we started into 'Gun Fire'. The way we pumped shells at them was glorious to see. The infantry in front of us say that our fire effect wasn't human. It was hell. They told us there was a sheet of flame all along the parapets of the German trenches from the bursting of our shells. The second day, we fired between twelve and fourteen hundred rounds in two hours. We worked all day and the whole of the nights were spent in digging. It was an act of Providence that we got the opportunity to dig, for the German artillery found us and they sure did find us too. We were firing about thirty minute intervals when a high explosive burst about 100 yards in front of us and then about 100 yards behind, two more got us in the 25 yard bracket, then I knew we were in for it. Their line was perfect, right in the centre of the battery, after that it was whiz! bang! all day and we started to have men hit. I swear the shells were not more that two feet above our gun wagons, which we use for protection. I stood up to take some shell out of the wagon body when one went whiz over my head. I felt the rush of air and the concussion as distinctly as one feels the discharge of one of our own guns when near it. I told you the last of the day's happenings in my last letter.

Major Beattie came to see us that afternoon. It was from him that we got the idea of what was in front of us. I think we gave the Germans a very fair repetition of what they gave our poor boys the previous day. We made a direct hit on a German gun and put the whole business up in the air, that evens the score with them, they blew up one of ours - the very one I was working at, by the way.

It is about the same thing every day, quiet for a while then all our Batteries open up and between the noise of their explosion and that of the German shells of all sizes, it is indeed a bedlam.

One of our boys had a shell explode directly under him, it threw him ten or twelve feet in the air and apart from a bad bruising and shaking up, he is very little hurt. We are beginning to call ours the 'Lucky 4th' - long may it continue.

They shelled our billet day before yesterday. I think they were searching for the Battery, they did not find it but they found our poor hut. It was blown full of holes. Splinters from those big shells fly for a quarter of, yes for half a mile. I saw one of the 'coal boxes' burst under a French ammunition wagon. It was a long way off, but through my glasses it seemed to lift wagon, limber horses and men completely clear of the ground. I fear it killed or wounded all the horses and men. The big shells are 17 inches in diameter. The English Tommies call them 'tram Cars: from the peculiar rumbling roar they make flying through the air. It is exactly like a tram-car or street car as we Canadians call them.

It is getting dark and my head is aching from the 'daily row' so au revoir.

E.L. MacNACHTAN
4th Battery, 1st Brigade, C.F.A.10

     The following newspaper article appeared in the Colborne, Ontario The Colborne Express 17 February 1921 :
Appointed to Command the 14th Field Battery
We understand that Capt. Ted MacNachtan, son of Col. N. F. MacNachtan, C.V.O., has been appointed to the command of the 14th Field Battery, with the rank of Major. Capt. MacNachtan, who went overseas in the ranks in 1914 with the 4th Battery, C.F.A., obtained his captaincy overseas. He is now in the military hospital at Kingston, recovering from a gunshot wound in the arm. We congratulate him on his well-deserved appointment. -- Sentinel-Star.12
E L MacNachtan of Cobourg, Ontario was the informant on the death registration of his father, Col. Neil Ferguson MacNachtan who died on 10 December 1928.13 E L McNachtan was the informant on the death registration of hus step-mother, Edith Isabel Radclyffe who died on 3 August 1933.14

Link to the Canadian Great War Project:; "Soldier Page" for Captain Edmund Lawder MacNachtan15

Citations

  1. [S309] Enlistment papers & Service Files, Soldiers of the First World War, WWI Attestation Papers search (Ottawa, ON: Library and Archives Canada), Lt. Edmund Lawder MacNachtan Attestation paper. Hereinafter cited as WWI Service Files.
  2. [S1443] Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Edmund Lawder Macnachtan
    His father was a "Merchant in Cobourg.". Hereinafter cited as ON Births 1869-1913.
  3. [S1443] ON Births 1869-1913, online Ontario, Canada Births, Name: Edmund Macnachton Lawder
    His father was a "Merchant in Cobourg."
  4. [S3573] Neil F McNachtan household, Jun 5, 1911 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page 3, Family: 36, Library and Archives Canada (LAC), Neil F McNachtan household.
  5. [S3574] N F McNachtan household, 19 Apr, 1901 Canada census, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Cobourg, Northumberland West, Ontario; Page: 15; Family: 171, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Roll: T-6464.
  6. [S309] Enlistment papers & Service Files, WWI Service Files, WWI Attestation Papers search, CEF Service File (large PDF file): Captain Edmund Lawder MacNachtan.
  7. [S3580] Leigh LeBlanc, "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan," e-mail message from email address withheld for privacy (Ottawa, Ontario) to Rick Moffat, 17 Jan 2012, After finding the MacNachtan's in the OCFA index, I contacted volunteer Leigh LeBlanc who provided transcriptions.. Hereinafter cited as "Cemetery Look-up - Cobourg Union - MacNachtan."
  8. [S219] Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid (1996), online http://www.islandnet.com/ocfa/, MacNACHTON, Edmund L., Maj.     Cobourg Union     Northumberland     Hamilton     LSGS-019. Hereinafter cited as OCFA.
  9. [S3577] Canada Letters & Images Project, The, online http://www.canadianletters.ca/cobourgLetter.php, Several letters from other Cobourg soldiers refer to Edmund as "Ted.". Hereinafter cited as CL&PP.
  10. [S3577] CL&PP, online http://www.canadianletters.ca/cobourgLetter.php, Letters from Edmund L MacNachtan to his father, Lieut-Col. N.F. MacNachtan, C.V.O.
  11. [S3577] CL&PP, online http://www.canadianletters.ca/cobourgLetter.php, Letter from Edmund L MacNachtan to his father, Lieut-Col. N.F. MacNachtan, C.V.O.
  12. [S8181] Appointed to Command the 14th Field Battery, The Colborne Express, Colborne, ON, Feb 17, 1921, Page 1, column 1 viewed at Cramache Archives, Appointed to Command the 14th Field Battery. Hereinafter cited as Colborne Express.
  13. [S1442] Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946 (Publisher: Archives of Ontario), Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946; "This database is an index (with images) to over 2 million deaths that were registered in Ontario from 1869 to 1938, and 1943 to 1946. The database also includes deaths of Ontario military personnel overseas from 1939-1947"; cited as "ON Deaths, 1869-1946., Name: Neil Ferguson MacNachtan.
  14. [S1442] "ON Deaths, 1869-1946", online Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas, 1869-1946: ame:     Edith J Mcnachton [I read McNachtan]
    [Edith J Radclyffe].
  15. [S2] Personal knowledge/research of Rick Moffat (Mesa, AZ 85207).